>
>
>
Israel develops pocket-sized infrared spectrometer that detects contents of items
Check category

Israel develops pocket-sized infrared spectrometer that detects contents of items

Israel develops pocket-sized infrared spectrometer that detects contents of items

  • Categories:Industry news
  • Author:China Machinery Network
  • Origin:
  • Time of issue:2014-08-14 09:59
  • Views:0
Information

  Recently, an Israeli inventor launched a pocket-sized infrared spectrometer called SCiO, which can be used to deconstruct the chemical composition of physical objects around you by swiping them to test not only the composition of food, but also whether plants need watering, what medicines are actually being removed from their labels, and even to test the composition of gold, rubber and leather. At the same time, it will quickly feed real-time information to a smartphone, which in the future may dramatically change the way people shop and improve the quality of their healthy lives.
  Consumers are overwhelmed by the amount of counterfeit goods in our lives today, but there are few effective ways to identify them. If there is a pocket test instrument in the palm of your hand, like Harry Potter's wand, use it to help customers who love gold to identify the purity of gold; for the beauty of the lady test cosmetics containing heavy metal ingredients; verify the elderly high price to buy health products in the expensive Chinese medicine ingredients content, as if to make the mixed world suddenly become transparent and clear, that's how great!
  Today, this whim was realized by an Israeli inventor. His newly launched pocket-sized infrared spectrometer, called SCiO, can deconstruct the chemical composition of a physical object by sweeping it around you, testing not only the composition of food, but also whether plants need watering, what medicines are actually torn off their labels, and even testing the composition of gold, rubber and leather. At the same time, it will provide real-time feedback to smartphones, which could dramatically change the way people shop in the future and improve the quality of their healthy lives.
  The next generation of "Google search"?
  The inventor of the pocket scanner is Israel Tel Aviv, one of the founders of the consumer physics team, CEO Delor Sharon. The engineer, who holds an MBA from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), describes SCiO as potentially the next generation of "Google search".
  He found that the current process of searching for information is cumbersome, the user must think about a concept or problem, and find a keyword related to it to type into the search engine, in order to get some useful results. SCiO, on the other hand, means the Latin verb "to know".
  The infrared spectrometer is about the size of a thumb and resembles a USB stick. It is very easy to use, the user does not need to be in a laboratory, let alone know what the item is, just swipe its flashing infrared light pointed directly at the surface of the object, you can know the ingredients of the item under investigation in your phone, for example, can get related to different types of food nutrition, including cheese, fruits, vegetables, dressings, salad dressings, cooking oil, etc., can export their nutritional content (such as calories, fats, carbohydrates and proteins), quality, maturity and damage. In addition, the device learns about the growth of potted plants, analyzes their water content, and alerts the user if it's time to water them.
  The gadget's features seem to bring more fun in terms of changing lives. And the development team says that the future possibilities for SCiO are endless, with eventual applications that could have life-saving uses, including analyzing soil or hydroponic solutions by repeatedly comparing databases, identifying contaminated food, identifying identification drugs in real time, verifying medications or supplements to determine if they are counterfeit, and also supporting the detection of jewelry, leather, rubber, oil and plastic, and even the composition of human tissue or bodily fluids! .
  Enrich the database with each use
  "I think SCiO will change the world in many ways in the future," Sharon stressed. He said, "The device's ability to detect chemicals in the future will be very beneficial to areas such as health and safety. It's a small thing, and the big changes it will bring are just beginning."
  Currently, SCiO is able to test items focused on food, plants and pharmaceuticals, with commercially available applications for just three key programs: food, pharmaceuticals and gardening. Salon, on the other hand, envisions a database that will bring together vast amounts of information, enabling users to analyze the condition of the physical objects around them in a timely manner. With the subsequent opening up of third-party development interfaces to maximise the variety of materials being analysed, the ideal future scenario is for SCiO to be able to analyse 'anything'.
  It works by emitting infrared light to activate material molecules, reflecting the light from the molecules to determine the composition of the material, then matching the information, expanding the data into a database, and transferring more data to the cloud app via iOS or Android smartphones, with information about the item being sent to the user's phone and displayed on the screen in seconds.
  We wanted to find the most intrinsically linked app in the world," said Sharon. This means that every time a user uses it, they are uploading the spectral markers of any material on Earth to the SCiO database, to help bring together a huge amount of information that will benefit many more people in the future."
  Professor Sanford, an expert in chemistry and spectroscopy at the Hebrew University in Israel, noted, "Over the past few decades, ever-changing technology has led to increasingly miniaturized products, and it is clear that SCiO represents a new step forward, as it could be the world's first pocket-sized sensor available to consumers. It will have a huge and profound impact on raising awareness of the world of materials around us."
  Development plans for a non-traditional approach
  The biggest issue facing SCiO at the moment is the accuracy of the measurements, and since it won't be available until December of this year, there are no users yet to verify how accurate it is, but this factor is key to the product's success.
  In response to this issue, Sharon explained that the gadget's capabilities are now limited by the relatively small size of its database. According to a recent report by Physicists.org, Sharon has so far raised more than $2 million from Kickstarter, a fundraising site with more than 11,000 backers, and expects to have SCiO in the hands of thousands of investors by the end of the year, which will help him build what he calls "the world's largest database of matter". ", which can be stored online and shared among users. In addition, hundreds of new backers will be recruited as developers to tweak and experiment with SCiO's software.
  Says Sharon: "Obviously, raising $2 million is pretty good enough, but it means more for building a community to get more people involved in creating it than it does for actual funding." He expects the gadget to "break into" the consumer market sometime next year for $299.
  Yossi Vardy, one of Israel's most successful high-tech investors, commented, "The non-traditional approach to the development program will be one of the biggest strengths of the SCiO instrument. It is an open innovation community whose success lies in its ability to recruit the maximum number of developers, and will thus have a large cloud of 'global brains' rich in ideas."

Copyright © 2020 上海欧达机电集团 沪ICP备09002154号-1 技术支持:中企动力